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Boating to islands around Palmer Station.
Photo Credit: Sean Bonnette
Neal Scheibe has a pretty nice office space at Palmer Station, as his duties sometimes require him to jump in a Zodiac to boat to nearby islands. All of the research associates get plenty of exercise as they check on experiments spread across each station.

The last word

Research associates answer the question: What's the best or most interesting thing about your job?

 

Robert Fuhrmann
Photo Credit: Robert Fuhrmann
Robert Fuhrmann

Robert Fuhrmann, South Pole Station

“There are those moments when the moon is down, the wind is barely blowing, the sky is blazingly clear with stars and the Milky Way Galaxy, and auroras are out in full swing that makes the walk out to ARO memorable. … The sense of remoteness and calm well beyond the station is difficult to put into words.”

 

Neal Scheibe, Palmer Station

Neal Scheibe

Photo Credit: Sean Bonnette
Neal Scheibe

“Satellite imagery and working with the weather. It’s something I don’t inherently understand coming into this position, so I find myself spending a lot of time learning more about it. It’s a pretty fascinating field, looking at the weather patterns and how they move. I understand why there’re so many people who work on it, and they can’t accurately predict the weather yet.”

 
Jason Bryenton
Photo Courtesy: Jason Bryenton
Jason Bryenton

 

Jason Bryenton, McMurdo Station

“Being here, working with researchers, and on projects that give insight into where we fit, is by and far the most interesting part of my job.”

 

 Return to main story: MacGyvers of polar science

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Curator: Peter Rejcek, Antarctic Support Contract | NSF Official: Winifred Reuning, Division of Polar Programs