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McMurdo Station Archives - 2019

Settling in For Winter

With the sun low on the horizon, station residents say their goodbyes before a number of them leave on the flight in March
Photo Credit: Isaac Sleadd
With the sun low on the horizon, station residents say their goodbyes before a number of them leave on the flight in March.
Dozens of penguins and seals congregate near New Zealands Scott Base after the sea ice broke up
Photo Credit: Isaac Sleadd
Dozens of penguins and seals congregate near New Zealand’s Scott Base after the sea ice broke up.
Named after the scavenging bird that nests in Antarctica, station residents participate in the annual skua sorting party in the waste barn
Photo Credit: Chris Simon
Named after the scavenging bird that nests in Antarctica, station residents participate in the annual "skua sorting party" in the waste barn
A firefighter adjusts a gurney during the stations mass casualty drill
Photo Credit: Kira Morris Geer
A firefighter adjusts a gurney during the station's mass casualty drill.

For McMurdo Station, the month of March is a period of transition. The busy summer’s science and special construction projects have drawn down, hundreds of workers and researchers left the continent, and those of us who remain spent the month easing into the cold, dark and quiet Antarctic winter. Day-to-day operations took on more of a “caretaker” quality as the station turned down to the pilot light for the off-season. Winter in McMurdo is all about maintaining our facilities in some of the harshest conditions on Earth, while at the same time preparing for next summer's busy research season. It is a tough job, but we love it.

To complement our various sociological transitions, Mother Nature underwent some rather dramatic changes last month. With each passing day, the sun spent more and more time below the horizon. People stayed up late to watch the full moon rise. Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn shone brightly in the night sky. The increasing darkness revealed a tremendous number of stars and satellites—things I had not seen in over four months—and by the end of March, the Milky Way was visible. Some lucky individuals even caught a glimpse of the dreamlike Southern Lights (aurora australis), which danced overhead at three and four in the morning.

Perhaps not surprisingly, it has gotten colder here, with wind chills approaching -60 degrees Fahrenheit. Despite the bone-chilling, mustache-freezing temperatures, we at McMurdo Station are still enjoying the outdoors. About half of the Ross Island Trail System is still open to hikers and history buffs have been leading tours to Scott's Discovery Hut (built in 1902) and Hillary's Hut (built in 1956). Skis and bicycles are available to rent year-round, and I am always delighted (albeit somewhat bewildered) to see people riding their bicycles across the ice in a snow storm.

For those who preferred to stay indoors in March, there were plenty of recreation activities available. “The big gym” officially reopened after being beautifully resurfaced, and pickup basketball games became a weekly occurrence. Indoor rock climbing, fitness classes, dance parties, open mic, karaoke, and trivia provided numerous chances to unwind during our demanding 54 plus hour work weeks. There was even a Lego® show in the back of the galley which featured one extremely large and detailed interpretation of a polar research station.

When the opportunity presents itself, we like to have fun in ways that benefit the community. One great example of this is the annual “Skua” sorting party. Named after a local scavenging bird, “Skua” is the term for high-quality items that people give away when no longer needed or wanted. When hundreds of people leave station, as they did in February, countless piles of clothing, costumes, toiletries, books—you name it!—accumulate around station and end up at the Waste Barn for sorting. Music and bingo made for a lively and enjoyable time as volunteers dug through the bins in search of new treasures.

Another important community event was the more serious Mass Casualty Incident Drill. It’s a training exercise held every few months for station residents to practice emergency procedures in the event of a major accident. Teams of volunteers had trained weekly in anticipation of this crucial, station-wide exercise. Firefighters and EMTs, communications and laboratory technicians, stretcher bearers, auxiliary medics, and recorders came together to address a vehicle roll-over scenario. It was a high-adrenaline day, and the exercise was an overwhelming success. Events such as this serve to remind us that while life in Antarctica is often fun and enjoyable, we are still thousands of miles from civilization—in an extremely harsh environment where we must be prepared for anything.


February 2019 in Review

The cargo vessel Ocean Giant docked at the ice pier as station staff prepare to unload millions of pounds of cargo.
Photo Credit: Isaac Sleadd
The cargo vessel Ocean Giant, docked at the ice pier as station staff prepare to unload millions of pounds of cargo.
After some blustery weather the sea ice broke up exposing the ocean beneath
Photo Credit: Rose McAdoo
After some blustery weather, the sea ice broke up, exposing the ocean beneath. The seals hardly seemed to notice.
Station residents watch the sun dip below the horizon for the first time in four months.
Photo Credit: Rose McAdoo
Station residents watch the sun dip below the horizon for the first time in four months.
Station residents keep their distance as an Adelie penguin wanders through the station
Photo Credit: Isaac Sleadd
Station residents keep their distance as an Adelie penguin wanders through the station.

February began at full-throttle here in McMurdo Station, with the support staff working in shifts to unload our annual resupply vessel, the Ocean Giant. The U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Star had cleared a channel for the ship's arrival, and she remained nearby throughout the unloading. As soon as the 10.5 million pounds of cargo had been unloaded, teams were tasked with reloading the vessel with nearly as much waste and retrograde cargo bound for the United States. When the two ships finally sailed north, the station breathed a sigh of relief. It had been a hectic, though rewarding time for everyone involved.

The cargo we received included some mammoth concrete footers and steel beams destined for a new addition to the Science Support Center, dubbed the "IT&C Primary." A special construction crew spent the month tackling this exciting project, and it was a joy to watch the framework go up piece by piece. Meanwhile, the service men and women of the New Zealand Defense Force were busy helping distribute and organize supplies, resurfacing "the big gym" and renovating one of the dorms on station.

Early in the month, strong southerly winds brought an unexpected surprise: open water! Piece-by-piece, the sea ice broke up and blew north, leaving shimmering dark blue water all around the peninsula. This was quickly taken advantage of by pods of majestic orcas and minke whales, who delighted onlookers armed with binoculars and telephoto lenses. Overnight, whale watching had become the most popular recreational activity on station.

Perhaps the second most popular recreational activity of the month was put on by the "Stewies" (an affectionate term for the stewards who work in the galley). This hard-working, fun-loving group of people hosted prom (for adults), theme of which was "Under the Stars." The prom committee did a fantastic job decorating Gallagher's Pub, where two live bands played and a DJ spun club music until late. There was a photo booth which stayed busy, and Stewie Brandy was elected Prom Queen. Frosty Boy, our beloved soft-serve ice cream machine, was voted Prom King, although the honor was passed along to the next (human) runner up, Dennis the mountaineer.

One of the most difficult things about February is saying goodbye to dear friends. After the ships had left and the construction projects reached a stopping point, hundreds of people completed their contracts and flew north to warmer climates. This annual migration sees the population of McMurdo fall from just under one thousand people down to around 250 winter and shoulder-season workers. When it came time for each plane-load of people to depart, those of us who were staying behind gathered to form a "tunnel of love" or "hug train" to bid farewell to our friends as they headed to the ice runway. The mood was upbeat, however, with promises to keep in touch and perhaps see each other again when October rolls around and the main summer research season ramps up.

It is feeling more like winter every day now. The sun set on February 20 for the first time in four months, and some particularly determined folks stayed up late to see the spectacle, which occurred at 1:46 am. In less than a week, we had lost five hours of daylight, and there were some especially cold and windy days to remind us of Antarctica's awesome power. What's more, there were numerous, endearing wildlife encounters and spectacular sunsets to remind us of the incredible beauty of this place we call home.


Month in Review - January 2019

Researchers at SALSA pull up a water column sampler from Lake Mercer, a subglacial body of water under three-quarters of a mile of ice.
Photo Credit: Mike Lucibella
Researchers at SALSA pull up a water column sampler from Lake Mercer, a subglacial body of water under three-quarters of a mile of ice.
Ioffe Lee takes a swing at the annual McMurdo softball tournament
Photo Credit: Mike Lucibella
Ioffe Lee takes a swing at the annual McMurdo softball tournament.
The cargo ship Ocean Giant (foreground) arrives at the pier carrying cargo for the station, with the Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Star in the background.
Photo Credit: Mike Lucibella
The cargo ship Ocean Giant (foreground) arrives at the pier carrying cargo for the station, with the Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Star in the background.

January is always an exciting time for McMurdo Station, and this year was no exception. Revelers rang in the New Year at Ice Stock, our annual outdoor music festival, where local bands took to the stage and spectators—some dressed in penguin and dinosaur costumes—danced in the sunshine until the wee hours of the morning. The festivities afforded everyone the opportunity to unwind a little before buckling down for January, one of the busiest months of the year.

It was an exciting month for science. The Long Duration Balloon Facility saw its share of "ups and downs." Two balloon-borne telescopes were launched into the stratosphere but returned to Earth sooner than expected and in locations that made recovery of the instruments difficult. However, the ingenuity and collaboration that went into those recovery efforts exemplified the resiliency which characterizes so many of the scientific endeavors pursued here an Antarctica each year.

Farther afield, researchers and technicians at SALSA Camp successfully drilled into sub-glacial Lake Mercer for the first time. After taking numerous water and sediment samples, the teams packed up and returned to McMurdo, where their joyful exuberance was infectious. Groups of five or ten could be seen in the evenings at the coffee house raising a glass to a job well done. Teams from other deep-field camps returned during this time as well, and happy reunions took place all over station as “townies” were reacquainted with friends who had been gone—some of them for months.

Although Ice Stock had come and gone, the station still had plenty of opportunities for recreation. The wharf provided the perfect place for a friendly interdepartmental softball tournament, and there was some stiff competition as teams battled for nearly seven hours in the falling snow. Spectators cheered and heckled as players gave it their all, and everybody had a great time.

The McMurdo Alternative Art Gallery, another local tradition, was held in the fuels barn. There were original paintings, sculptures, a live portrait studio, performance art, and even fortune telling. Later in the month, the carpentry and waste departments answered in kind with two of their own well-received live music events. The artistic and musical abilities of Antarctic contract workers never cease to amaze.

By the end of January, the population of McMurdo had swelled as personnel from the U.S. Navy and New Zealand Defense Forces joined in to help unload the approaching cargo ship. The U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Star arrived first to cut a channel through the sea ice, and the crew was generous enough to let the community tour the ship. Some lucky individuals were selected by lottery to go on a morale cruise out to the ice edge, where they saw many seals and penguins. Days later, the cargo ship Ocean Giant appeared on the horizon carrying more than 10 million pounds of supplies — enough to last us through the coming year.

When January came to a close, energy levels were at an all-time high as men and women worked around the clock to offload the vessel. In the coming weeks, hundreds of people will be heading north as their contracts come to a close and McMurdo Station prepares to settle in for the Austral winter.